Friday, 11 January 2008

"How cool are dictaphones?" "stop", "new paragraph"

Today I had my first surgery at my GP placement. This means that I've got patients of my own, real...live...patients! I have my own room, my own computer, my own sign on the door, my own button on the computer to send in my own patients and all sorts of other cool stuff which I'll come onto later.

Throughout the last couple of years at other gp's I've always been able to see patients on my own before they see the GP but not to the extent that I can now. Now I have my own surgeries built into the computer system and the receptionists book patients in to see me... they must all be stark raving bonkers.

Anyway, it was great fun. That feeling I had from my elective where I felt like I was actually being a doctor came flooding back, although fortunately for the patients I'm still heavily supervised. My GP supervisor has slots in her surgery to come and check on me, make sure I'm not going to kill anyone and sign any prescriptions etc etc.

This morning I had 5xhalf hour slots - so the patients are actually getting a good deal, they get to spend 3 times as much time with me as they do with the doctor. Although most appointments don't tend to take that long, by the time I've worked out how the computer works and written up the histories (hopefully without referring them accidental for a vasectomy.) that half hour is soon gone. My first patient this morning was 40 minutes early, he must have been excited to see me.

It was an odd morning actually, 3 of my 5 patients went away with referrals to the hospital - 2 under the 2 week rule for the same thing. This of course meant that I had to do the referral letters - or more precisely I had to dictate them! This was by far the highlight of the morning, I'd always wanted to play with a dictaphone and dictate my own letters - it was unbelievably cool. So cool in fact that it took me about 40 minutes to dictate my 3 letters because I kept changing my mind about what I wanted to say and I kept recording over myself by accident. I used to sit in clinics and listen to consultants dictate their letters adding all sorts of weird and wonderful phrases wondering when I'd get my hands on a dictaphone. I kept my letters very professional - I dread to think what the consultants will think of them when they get them though - I'm sure I probably filled them with useless information about entirely irrelevant things but not to worry. Ok, I'll stop now, maybe I'm slightly too over-excited by this dictaphone thing, after all - referrals aren't generally that good for the patients.

Anyway, I didn't kill anyone, and even managed to come up with decent management plans. I really enjoyed myself, hopefully I didn't scare the patients too much.

Afternoon surgery starts at 4pm this afternoon, is it really bad that I hope somebody needs referring so I can dictate another letter?

15 comments:

jessica said...

I'm glad that you're enjoying yourself!!


I'm slightly confused though. So right now you're working in a family doctor-ish type of setting? (sorry. Maybe I'll get Xavier to explain it to me)

Anna said...

oh, I'm so jealous you get to play with dictaphones! I've been in dermatology and I haven't even taken a history, let alone worry about management plans...

the little medic said...

jessica - yeah thats basically it.

Xavier Emmanuelle said...

Sounds so cool! Your very own patients, that's awesome :)

Harry said...

Woah woah woah!

That is tres cool, I am insanely jealous!

Did you perform any basic exams??

the little medic said...

Harry - I did ALL the examinations. When the Dr came in to check I was doing alright she didn't even touch the patients. She trusted my examinations - even when I forgot something, she just told me to do it.

I got to do another referral this afternoon too! Only to orthopaedics though so my letter was short and sweet.

Kelly said...

Wow! That all sounds brilliant. :-) Boys and toys...

cherrypicker said...

Your enthusiasm is extremely refreshing and I certainly commend your clear patient focus but I am afraid to say that the dictaphone bit wears off very quickly especially if you have a half deaf medical secretary who managed to mishear a huge amount of words and could have created her own unique medical dictionary of interesting and sometime creative but actually useless and imaginary conditions. Make sure you read the letters before signing as there is nothing worse than an orthpod ringing up asking what the hell a 'contorted filament' is and why the patient is taking creosote for their hyperlipidaemia! Be warning you'll be praying for the day the tape runs out!!! Good luck I suspect you will go far. No actaully i know you will go far! Keep it up

Emma said...

Just imagine when the new IT systems are fully in place you won't get to dictate anything you will just have to push a button...enjoy it while it lasts..pleased your enjoying yourself and 1/2 with a GP now that would be good..x

missbliss said...

I would never be able to resist saying "stop", "Hammertime".

Elaine said...

Glad to "hear" such real enthusiasm from you, tlm; long may it last (suspect the dictaphone enthusiasm will have a limited lifetime)

DundeeMedStudent said...

I'm glad your having such a good time in GP land, hopefully by the time I get that far I'll have nay enthusiasm left!

the little medic said...

no no no, the dictaphone enthusiasm will be there for everrrrrr.

ditzydoctor said...

woweeee HOW COOL IS THAT! it's not fair, we don't have dictations here! :(

Vi vi vi vooom!!!!!!!! said...

It would have been quicker to write them yourself! lol. Thanks for dropping by, I gather you came through my cyber twin emma. This is scary, reading a (nearly) docs blog, my god, you guys are human? ;P